African-Americans, Healthcare, inequality, Social Problems

The New Health Care. Race and Medicine: The Harm That Comes From Mistrust. Racial bias still affects many aspects of health care. In 1997, President Clinton and Vice President Al Gore helped Herman Shaw, 94, a Tuskegee Syphilis Study victim, during a news conference. Mr. Clinton apologized to black men whose syphilis went untreated by government doctors. In 1997, President Clinton and Vice President Al Gore helped Herman Shaw, 94, a Tuskegee Syphilis Study victim, during a news conference. Mr. Clinton apologized to black men whose syphilis went untreated by government doctors. By Austin Frakt Jan. 13, 2020. Racial discrimination has shaped so many American institutions that perhaps it should be no surprise that health care is among them. Put simply, people of color receive less care — and often worse care — than white Americans. Reasons includes lower rates of health coverage; communication barriers; and racial stereotyping based on false beliefs. Predictably, their health outcomes are worse than those of whites.

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Affordable Care Act, Healthcare, Social Problems, Social Safety Net

Trump Administration Unveils a Major Shift in Medicaid. States will be able to cap a portion of spending for the safety-net program, a change likely to diminish the number of people receiving health benefits through it. Seema Verma, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services administrator, center, and administration officials had been seeking to limit the open-ended federal funding that the Medicaid statute requires for months. Seema Verma, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services administrator, center, and administration officials had been seeking to limit the open-ended federal funding that the Medicaid statute requires for months.By Abby Goodnough. Jan. 30, 2020 WASHINGTON — The Trump administration said on Thursday that it would allow states to cap Medicaid spending for many poor adults, a major shift long sought by conservatives that gives states the option of reducing health benefits for millions who gained coverage through the program under the Affordable Care Act. Seema Verma, the administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, said states that sought the arrangement — an approach often referred to as block grants — would have broad flexibility to design coverage for the affected group under Medicaid, the state-federal health insurance program for the poor that was created more than 50 years ago as part of President Lyndon B. Johnson’s Great Society.

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Healthcare, Social Problems, Social Safety Net

Opinion: The Big, Feminist Policy Idea America’s Families Have Been Waiting For

How Universal Family Care could help people throughout their lives.

By Ai-jen Poo and Benjamin W. Veghte

Ms. Poo and Dr. Veghte are architects of Universal Family Care.

June 23, 2019

A vast majority of Americans cannot afford to take care of their families. But they see it as their responsibility, and too often their failure. To get by, they cobble together solutions, even quitting their jobs to look after a newborn or when a parent becomes ill. Things are getting worse as baby boomers age into their 70s. America’s piecemeal and expensive care infrastructure, created a half century ago, has reached a breaking point.

Our organization will unveil a new social insurance program on Monday called Universal Family Care that could fix this crisis. It would provide affordable early child care, paid leave, assistance for people with disabilities and elder care for people of all incomes. We need an integrated approach because no one experiences needs in isolation: We might need help right after an injury, or over the course of our lives to help a disabled family member thrive.

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African-Americans, Healthcare, Race, Social Problems

The New Health Care – Doctors and Racial Bias: Still a Long Way to Go. It would be easy to look at a photo from the 1980s and conclude that things have changed. Many have not. Image: A lot of research shows that African-American patients are treated differently than white patients when it comes to cardiovascular procedures. By Aaron E. Carroll Feb. 25, 2019

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