African-Americans, Healthcare, inequality, Social Problems

The New Health Care. Race and Medicine: The Harm That Comes From Mistrust. Racial bias still affects many aspects of health care. In 1997, President Clinton and Vice President Al Gore helped Herman Shaw, 94, a Tuskegee Syphilis Study victim, during a news conference. Mr. Clinton apologized to black men whose syphilis went untreated by government doctors. In 1997, President Clinton and Vice President Al Gore helped Herman Shaw, 94, a Tuskegee Syphilis Study victim, during a news conference. Mr. Clinton apologized to black men whose syphilis went untreated by government doctors. By Austin Frakt Jan. 13, 2020. Racial discrimination has shaped so many American institutions that perhaps it should be no surprise that health care is among them. Put simply, people of color receive less care — and often worse care — than white Americans. Reasons includes lower rates of health coverage; communication barriers; and racial stereotyping based on false beliefs. Predictably, their health outcomes are worse than those of whites.

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African-Americans, Race, Social Problems

Opinion: How to Convince a White Realtor You’re Middle Class. Black people expend daily energy to counteract racial stereotypes and get fair treatment. By Karyn Lacy Dr. Lacy is a professor of sociology. Jan. 21. When the front desk clerk at a Portland, Ore., hotel told Felicia Gonzales, a black woman, that guests were required to sign a two-page “no party” agreement in order to check in, she thought the request was so strange that she decided to sit in the lobby to see if white guests were asked to do the same. They weren’t.

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African-Americans, Race, Social Problems, Stratification

Opinion: Black People’s Land Was Stolen

Any discussion of reparations must include how this happened, who did it, and the laws, policies and practices that allowed it.

By Andrew W. Kahrl

Dr. Kahrl is an associate professor of history and African-American studies at the University of Virginia.

June 20, 2019

A House Judiciary subcommittee on Wednesday held the first hearing in over a decade on the issue of reparations for black Americans. The hearing took place, fittingly, on the Juneteenth holiday, commemorating the announcement of the end of slavery in the United States, and five years after the writer Ta-Nehisi Coates, who testified, reignited the debate with his 2014 essay “The Case for Reparations.” Once a fringe topic, reparations has emerged as an issue in the 2020 presidential campaign, with several leading candidates for the Democratic nomination expressing support for various measures to atone for America’s racist past.

Thanks to Mr. Coates and others, today’s movement for reparations places as much emphasis on the racist public policies of the 20th century, which denied black Americans opportunities to build wealth and left them vulnerable to all manner of economic exploitation, as it does on the crimes of slavery.

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African-Americans, criminal justice, Race

Black People Are Charged at a Higher Rate Than Whites. What if Prosecutors Didn’t Know Their Race?

George Gascón, San Francisco’s district attorney, said the lopsided number of African-Americans in the city’s criminal justice system had compelled him to try something new.

By Timothy Williams

June 12, 2019

While riding the train in San Francisco three years ago, a white man told an African-American man that he smelled bad and should move away from him. An argument followed, and the African-American man, Michael Smith, was eventually tackled by police officers and accused of assaulting them.

The San Francisco District Attorney’s Office charged Mr. Smith with seven counts, including battery on a police officer and resisting arrest. But after viewing body camera footage, a jury acquitted Mr. Smith, then 23, on most of the charges, and the prosecutors dropped the other counts. Mr. Smith’s lawyer said he does not believe a white person would have been arrested or prosecuted.

While the district attorney’s office disagreed with that assessment of the case, George Gascón, the district attorney, has acknowledged that a disproportionate number of African-Americans are prosecuted in the city, which led him to ask a troubling question: To what extent does bias affect the work of prosecutors?

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African-Americans, Opinion, politics, Social Problems

Opinion … Dear Candidates: Here Is What Black People Want

We long for the same things as everyone else, and yet few campaigns treat us as if our experiences matter.

By Alicia Garza

Ms. Garza, a founder of the Black Lives Matter Global Network, is the head of the Black Futures Lab.

May 28, 2019

During election season, I always cringe when I see candidates eating fried chicken next to a bottle of hot sauce in Harlem or taking staged photos with black leaders. These shallow symbolic gestures are not a substitute for meaningful engagement with black voters. And candidates should know that we see right through them.

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African-Americans, Healthcare, Race, Social Problems

The New Health Care – Doctors and Racial Bias: Still a Long Way to Go. It would be easy to look at a photo from the 1980s and conclude that things have changed. Many have not. Image: A lot of research shows that African-American patients are treated differently than white patients when it comes to cardiovascular procedures. By Aaron E. Carroll Feb. 25, 2019

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Education, Race, Social Problems

‘I Love My Skin!’ Why Black Parents Are Turning to Afrocentric Schools. While New York City schools are deeply segregated, some black families are choosing an alternative to integration. Thomas Lewis, a martial arts instructor, teaches a lesson at Little Sun People. The school has a new theme each month; in November, students studied human bodies with the help of a black pediatrician. Thomas Lewis, a martial arts instructor, teaches a lesson at Little Sun People. The school has a new theme each month; in November, students studied human bodies with the help of a black pediatrician. By Eliza Shapiro Jan. 8, 2019

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