African-Americans, Education, Race, Wisconsin

The video was created to show off the University of Wisconsin. Instead, it set off a furor, and a reckoning over what it means to be a black student on campus. By Julie Bosman, Emily Shetler and Natalie Yahr. Jan. 1, 2020 MADISON, Wis.

— The video was just two minutes long: a sunny montage of life at the University of Wisconsin’s flagship campus in Madison. Here were hundreds of young men and women cheering at a football game, dancing in unison, riding bicycles in a sleek line, “throwing the W” for the camera, singing a cappella, leaping into a lake. “Home is where we grow together,” a voice-over said. “It’s where the hills are. It’s eating our favorite foods. It’s where we can all harmonize as one. Home is Wisconsin cheese curds. It’s welcoming everyone into our home.” Advertisement Continue reading the main story Days before Homecoming Week, the student homecoming committee, tasked with producing the video, posted it online. The outrage was almost instantaneous. Virtually every student in the video was white.

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Education, Social Problems

New York Joins Movement to Abandon Use of Student Tests in Teacher Evaluations South Bronx Preparatory is one of the thousands of New York schools that will be impacted by an overhaul of the state’s teacher evaluation system. Image: South Bronx Preparatory is one of the thousands of New York schools that will be impacted by an overhaul of the state’s teacher evaluation system. By Eliza Shapiro Feb. 1, 2019

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Education, Race, Social Problems

‘I Love My Skin!’ Why Black Parents Are Turning to Afrocentric Schools. While New York City schools are deeply segregated, some black families are choosing an alternative to integration. Thomas Lewis, a martial arts instructor, teaches a lesson at Little Sun People. The school has a new theme each month; in November, students studied human bodies with the help of a black pediatrician. Thomas Lewis, a martial arts instructor, teaches a lesson at Little Sun People. The school has a new theme each month; in November, students studied human bodies with the help of a black pediatrician. By Eliza Shapiro Jan. 8, 2019

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